10 Fastest Animals (Land Based) On Earth

 

 

How fast we can run, a normal human can run as fast as 40-50 miles an hour. Now let's check fastest animal on plant who can change speed in a second.

 

1. Cheetah

 

The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal— as fast as 112 to 120 km/h (70 to 75 mph) in short bursts covering distances up to 500 m (1,600 ft), and has the ability to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in three seconds.

 

The cheetah has a small head with high-set eyes. Black "tear marks" running from the corner of its eyes down the sides of the nose to its mouth keep sunlight out of its eyes and aid in hunting and seeing long distances. Its thin and fragile body make it well-suited to short bursts of high speed, but not to long-distance running.

 

Agility, rather than raw speed, accounts for much of the cheetah's ability to catch prey. Cheetahs can accelerate four times as fast as a human (thanks to greater muscle power) and can slow down by 14 kilometers per hour in one stride. They can hunt successfully in densely vegetated areas

 

 

2. Pronghorn antelope

 

The pronghorn is the second fastest land mammal in world, being built for maximum predator evasion through running. The top speed is very hard to measure accurately and varies between individuals; it can run 56-60 km/h for 6 km and 67-70 km/h for 1.6 km.

 

It is often cited as the second-fastest land animal, second only to the cheetah. It can, however, sustain high speeds longer than cheetahs.University of Idaho zoologist John Byers has suggested the pronghorn evolved its running ability to escape from extinct predators such as the American cheetah, since its speed greatly exceeds that of extant North American predators.

 

Compared to its body size, the pronghorn has a large windpipe, heart, and lungs to allow it to take in large amounts of air when running. Additionally, pronghorn hooves have two long, cushioned, pointed toes which help absorb shock when running at high speeds. They also have an extremely light bone structure and hollow hair. Pronghorns are built for speed, not for jumping.

 

Their ranges are sometimes affected by sheep ranchers' fences. However, they can be seen going under fences, sometimes at high speed. For this reason, the Arizona Antelope Foundation and others are in the process of removing the bottom barbed wire from the fences, and/or installing a barbless bottom wire.

 

 

3. Lion

Loin

 

The Lion (Panthera leo) is the second largest cat in the world, right behind tigers and are slated to be the fastest wild cats with top running speed of 80 km/h though it lasts only for very short bursts and can be highly exhausting, hence they have to be close to their prey before starting the attack.

 

 

4. Thomson's gazelle

 

In addition to running at high speeds, Thomson's gazelles also use a bounding leap, called "stotting" or "pronking," to avoid predators. The Thomson's gazelle can reach speeds of 40 miles (64 kilometers) an hour

 

Gazelles are nimble and beautiful animals, with a variety of stripes and markings that accentuate their tan buff coats and white rumps. They also boast a impressive, ringed horns. These attributes make many gazelles attractive as game animals.

 

After a pregnancy of about six months, female gazelles give birth to one or two young and hide them in the plains grasses. These infants will remain out of sight for days or even weeks, being periodically nursed by their mother, until they are old enough to join the mother's herd, in the case of females, or a bachelor herd.

 

 

5. Wildebeest

 

The wildebeest, an antelope, exists as two species: the blue wildebeest and the black wildebeest. Both are extremely fast runners, which allows them to flee from predators. They are better at endurance running than at sprinting.

 

The gnu (pronounced "g-new" or simply "new") is a member of the antelope family, although its heavy build and disproportionately large forequarters make it look more bovine. Gnus can reach 8 feet (2.4 meters) in length, stand 4.5 feet (1.4 meters) tall at the shoulders and weigh up to 600 pounds (272 kilograms). Both males and females grow horns.

 

 

6. Springbok

 

Springbok running with normal speed of 88km/h. The springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) is a medium-sized brown and white antelope-gazelle of southwestern Africa.[2] It is extremely fast and can reach speeds of 100 km/h (62 mph) and can leap 4 m (13 feet) through the air.

 

The springbok, an antelope of the gazelle tribe in southern Africa, can make long jumps and sharp turns while running. Unlike pronghorns, springboks are poor long-distance runners.

 

 

7. Quarter horse

 

The American Quarter Horse is an American breed of horse that excels at sprinting short distances. Its name came from its ability to outdistance other horse breeds in races of a quarter mile or less; some individuals have been clocked at speeds up to 55 mph (88.5 km/h).

 

The American Quarter Horse is the most popular breed in the United States today, and the American Quarter Horse Association is the largest breed registry in the world, with more than 5 million American Quarter Horses registered.

 

 

8. Cape hunting dog

 

Cape hunting dog has normal speed of 72 km/h.it is also called African wild dog or painted dog. African wild dogs live in packs that are usually dominated by a monogamous breeding pair. The female has a litter of 2 to 20 pups, which are cared for by the entire pack. These dogs are very social, and packs have been known to share food and to assist weak or ill members

 

African hunting dogs are endangered. They are faced with shrinking room to roam in their African home. They are also quite susceptible to diseases spread by domestic animals.

 

 

9. Elk

 

Elk has speed of 45km/h. Elk range in forest and forest-edge habitat, feeding on grasses, plants, leaves and bark. Male elk have large antlers which are shed each year. Males also engage in ritualized mating behaviors during the rut, including posturing, antler wrestling (sparring), and bugling, a loud series of vocalizations which establishes dominance over other males and attracts females

 

 

10. Coyote

 

Coote has normal speed of 43km/h. is a canid native to North America. It is a smaller, more basal animal than its close relative, the gray wolf, being roughly the North American equivalent to the old world golden jackal, though it is larger and more predatory in nature.

 

It is listed as "least concern" by the IUCN, on account of its wide distribution and abundance throughout North America, even southwards through Mexico and Central America. It is a highly versatile species, whose range has expanded amidst human environmental modification.

 

This expansion is ongoing, and it may one day reach South America, as shown by the animal's presence beyond the Panama Canal in 2013.[4] As of 2005, 19 subspecies are recognized.

Sources
nationalgeographic.com (Cheetah Speed)
Natural History Magazine, March 1974.
The American Museum of Natural History.
The Wildlife Conservation Society.
wiki.